Move Through Unlit Surfaces To Escape Prison In See You On The Other Side

See You On The Other Side

The darkness will swallow you up if you’re not careful in See You On The Other Side [Windows download]. Made by a student group from Aalborg University in Denmark, this first-person puzzle game is inspired by Closure, which is to say it takes that game’s light-based puzzle mechanic and applies it to 3D space. In short, you can move through unlit surfaces, which is both an advantage and a problem you have to solve.

Your grand task is to escape a gloomy prison and get to “the other side.” You start off inside a cell behind a locked door with no clear way to get out. However, the game does inform you that you can pick up items by pressing E, and you may notice that there’s a large painting that you can pick up leaning against one of the walls. Forget worrying about why there’s a painting in your cell in the first place and concentrate on thinking about how you can use your unique ability to pass through unlit objects to get out of there.


“…push a ball of light through the darkness to provide a safe path, instead of falling through the dark floors.”

Once you do get out, the game starts to open up, until you come to another dead end, and then another. Eventually, you’ll get to larger areas within the prison, in which you’ll have to hop between the circles of light shining on the floor, navigate spinning light beams distorted by ceiling fans and push a ball of light through the darkness to provide a safe path, instead of falling through the dark floors. None of it is too tricky.

See You On The Other Side

See You On The Other Side is only a short game, but there are some pretty smart puzzles in there to solve that drag it out to a decent length. If you take too long to solve them or die too many times, then the game will drop you a hint. I was lucky it did in a couple of spots, because I got stuck due to its not being entirely clear which direction you’re supposed be trying to head in.


“The player’s goal is to escape a gloomy asylum/prison, to get to ‘the other side’”

For a quick example, I did not know that my goal was to pass through a metal fence at one point, so although I could see the puzzle before me, I didn’t know how to use the parts to help me progress. Then the game dropped a hint via some text on the wall, clearing up my confusion and thus allowing me to solve the puzzle and move on.

Despite the hint system, a couple of moments in the game could have done with a little more work just to clear up exactly what it is the player is trying to do. This mainly comes from the game’s tendency in a couple of places to distract the player’s attention from the direction they’re heading with scenery that adds to the feel of the place, but may not be worth it if leads to slight confusion. That was my experience, anyway. See how you get on with it.

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